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  #16  
Old 01-02-2020, 11:49 AM
ChiTownTrojan ChiTownTrojan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Domeshot17 View Post
None of that may be true. Itís going to get the pitches right, but that also includes all the framed strikes that should be balls
I wonder what the data says on whether the umps call more balls strikes, or more strikes balls. Anyone know?
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  #17  
Old 01-02-2020, 11:11 PM
TDog TDog is offline
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If pitchers start living with strikes higher in the strike zones, it would certainly effect launch angles and force hitters to swing at pitches they can't drive as well as forcing them to cover a deeper strike zone if not a wider strike zone.
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  #18  
Old 01-03-2020, 11:37 AM
WhiteSox5187 WhiteSox5187 is offline
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Originally Posted by TDog View Post
If pitchers start living with strikes higher in the strike zones, it would certainly effect launch angles and force hitters to swing at pitches they can't drive as well as forcing them to cover a deeper strike zone if not a wider strike zone.
Isnít that kind of happening already though? Like Giolito needs to work up in the zone cuz of his spin rate on his four-seamer, when he doesnít get the calls up in the zone he gets crushed.
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  #19  
Old 01-03-2020, 01:03 PM
bestkosher bestkosher is offline
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I would love to see a team pull a Bill Veeck and sign a very short player to mess with the digital zone
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  #20  
Old 01-03-2020, 03:51 PM
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Chez Chez is offline
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Originally Posted by bestkosher View Post
I would love to see a team pull a Bill Veeck and sign a very short player to mess with the digital zone
They already drafted one. Should be playing 2B by Memorial Day.
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  #21  
Old 01-04-2020, 10:29 PM
Mohoney Mohoney is offline
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I look forward to this groundbreaking technology making its major league debut on Opening Day 2024. Collect 3 more years of minor league data, do a non-binding trial run in 2023 to audit umpire accuracy and give them experience with the equipment, and go live with it in 2024. Maybe 2025 or 2026, depending on how things go.
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  #22  
Old 01-04-2020, 10:33 PM
Mohoney Mohoney is offline
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Originally Posted by TDog View Post
If pitchers start living with strikes higher in the strike zones, it would certainly effect launch angles and force hitters to swing at pitches they can't drive as well as forcing them to cover a deeper strike zone if not a wider strike zone.
The problem is that high strikes go really, really far if the pitcher canít throw 95+ or spin the hell out of it at about 2500+ RPM. Pedestrian fastballs can start up, but they donít stay up.
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  #23  
Old 01-04-2020, 11:36 PM
TDog TDog is offline
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The reality, which data often ignore, is that hitters can't look for both the high and the low pitch with the same swing. The height of the strike zone is more critical in changing a hitter's swing than the width of the strike zone. Factor in a pitcher's ability to change speeds with a consistent delivery, along with the ability to work inside and out, up and and down, and it isn't necessary to come close to 95 mph to be effective.

A taller strike zone gives pitchers more room to be effective to exploit hitters' weaknesses while amplifying many hitters' weaknesses.

Last edited by TDog; 01-04-2020 at 11:42 PM.
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  #24  
Old 01-05-2020, 12:36 AM
Mohoney Mohoney is offline
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Originally Posted by TDog View Post
The reality, which data often ignore, is that hitters can't look for both the high and the low pitch with the same swing. The height of the strike zone is more critical in changing a hitter's swing than the width of the strike zone. Factor in a pitcher's ability to change speeds with a consistent delivery, along with the ability to work inside and out, up and and down, and it isn't necessary to come close to 95 mph to be effective.

A taller strike zone gives pitchers more room to be effective to exploit hitters' weaknesses while amplifying many hitters' weaknesses.
In a game where centimeters can make a big difference, the few inches of drop prevented by higher velocity or more Magnus force can mean the difference between landing in the catcherís mitt and landing on the concourse.

Guys would not be covering both extremes of the strike zone anyway. They would be looking for something specific and taking pitches that are not there. If youíre just going to end up beating the ball into the ground at best, a swing may not even be worthwhile.
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  #25  
Old 01-05-2020, 04:54 AM
Grzegorz Grzegorz is offline
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Putting a ball in play, especially on the ground in the infield, could lead to: a bad bounce, an error by the fielder, a bad throw by the fielder, an error by the position player on the bag for the force, or failure by a pitcher to cover first base when the play necessitates.

To painfully state the obvious again (and again) the fastball is not the primary reason for the spate of strikeouts in the game. It is the inability of a majority of MLB hitters to adjust to changing speeds and the breaking ball. See Patrick Corbin and the article in the WSJ from a couple of years ago. He received the contract he did because he made players chase bad pitches and his breaking stuff.

In other words, he made his money by taking advantage the majority of today's hitters undisciplined approach at the plate.
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  #26  
Old 01-05-2020, 01:48 PM
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Increase the height, the vertical dimensions of the strike zone and you speed up the game by calling more strikes against hitters who are waiting for their pitch. Up and down, the strike zone changes the plane of the swing. Hitters who wait for a pitch on their terms will have to deal with pitchers who have more room to throw strikes on their terms.
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  #27  
Old 01-05-2020, 01:58 PM
Grzegorz Grzegorz is offline
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Originally Posted by TDog View Post
Increase the height, the vertical dimensions of the strike zone and you speed up the game by calling more strikes against hitters who are waiting for their pitch. Up and down, the strike zone changes the plane of the swing. Hitters who wait for a pitch on their terms will have to deal with pitchers who have more room to throw strikes on their terms.
Just call the strike zone as it exists in the rule book and the game will speed up.
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  #28  
Old 01-05-2020, 02:06 PM
Mohoney Mohoney is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TDog View Post
Increase the height, the vertical dimensions of the strike zone and you speed up the game by calling more strikes against hitters who are waiting for their pitch. Up and down, the strike zone changes the plane of the swing. Hitters who wait for a pitch on their terms will have to deal with pitchers who have more room to throw strikes on their terms.
Which will make batting averages go down even further, strikeouts skyrocket even more, and put home runs at even more of a premium than they are already at now.

It may speed up the game, but MLB has no desire to bring the game back to 1950s-1960s run totals.
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  #29  
Old 01-05-2020, 05:54 PM
TDog TDog is offline
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Which will make batting averages go down even further, strikeouts skyrocket even more, and put home runs at even more of a premium than they are already at now.

It may speed up the game, but MLB has no desire to bring the game back to 1950s-1960s run totals.
A bigger up-down strike zone, whether it is called by umpires or electronically, would change pitching and hitting enough to render your metrics meaningless. As it is, in this decade two World Series winners were at (or very near, without looking it up), the bottom of their league in home runs, and they were exciting teams to watch.

If you want to speed up the pace of the game, you are going to have to reduce not just the home run totals, but the emphasis on bases on balls (the biggest drag on the pace of the game) and giving up contact hitting in quest of home runs. It isn't about home run totals. It's about the excitement of watching a runner score from first on a line drive in the gap vs. the thrill of watching a bat flip.

Regardless of preference, though, there is no doubt that hitters who take pitches that won't give them their preferred launch angle would have to change their approach with a strike zone that forces them to adjust the plane of their swing.
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  #30  
Old 01-05-2020, 07:27 PM
Mohoney Mohoney is offline
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Youíre not getting it. The value of a ground ball relative to a home run is never going to get to the point where guys will abandon ďthe quest for the home runĒ to make hitting a ground ball in hopes of achieving a single a worthwhile goal.
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