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  #1  
Old 08-23-2019, 03:12 PM
kittle42 kittle42 is offline
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Default Breaking the unwritten rules

Good piece from ESPN on how players are using uniform numbers to express themselves.

The game needs more of this.
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  #2  
Old 08-28-2019, 02:04 PM
Wsoxmike59 Wsoxmike59 is offline
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Cool article, and as a Sox fan it took me awhile to get used to Carlton Fisk wearing number 72 when he came to the Southside. But after a few years of watching his Workman like efforts behind the plate and at bat, #72 grew as accustomed to me as did Dick Allen’s #15 or Bill Melton’s #14.

Same thing for Ozzie Guillen who shunned the notion that 13 was a superstitious or unlucky number, Ozzie turned #13 into something recognizable and identifiable as Little Looie’s #11.
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Old 08-28-2019, 03:43 PM
WhiteSox5187 WhiteSox5187 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wsoxmike59 View Post
Cool article, and as a Sox fan it took me awhile to get used to Carlton Fisk wearing number 72 when he came to the Southside. But after a few years of watching his Workman like efforts behind the plate and at bat, #72 grew as accustomed to me as did Dick Allen’s #15 or Bill Melton’s #14.

Same thing for Ozzie Guillen who shunned the notion that 13 was a superstitious or unlucky number, Ozzie turned #13 into something recognizable and identifiable as Little Looie’s #11.
I think Ozzie, and a lot of Venezuelan shortstops, wore 13 as a tribute to Dave Concepcion.
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Old 08-28-2019, 09:37 PM
SBSoxFan SBSoxFan is offline
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Originally Posted by WhiteSox5187 View Post
I think Ozzie, and a lot of Venezuelan shortstops, wore 13 as a tribute to Dave Concepcion.
And Fisk wore #27 in Boston. So, when he flipped Sox (socks?) he flipped his number.
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Old 08-28-2019, 10:07 PM
TDog TDog is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kittle42 View Post
Good piece from ESPN on how players are using uniform numbers to express themselves.

The game needs more of this.

This has been going on since at least the 1970s.
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  #6  
Old 08-29-2019, 01:04 AM
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Nellie_Fox Nellie_Fox is offline
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And Fisk wore #27 in Boston. So, when he flipped Sox (socks?) he flipped his number.
And if I recall correctly, his son Casey was born in 1972, so it served a double purpose.
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Old 08-29-2019, 01:40 AM
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And if I recall correctly, his son Casey was born in 1972, so it served a double purpose.

Yes, his son was born in 1972. He was voted AL Rookie of the Year in 1972. According to some reports at the time, his feelings for the year was the impetus in turning his number around. If it was Ken Kravec (I think 27 was his number when he came up with the Sox), he was traded at the end of spring training. In any case, Fisk showed class in not demanding the number when the Sox signed him and made a statement by keeping it at a time when it passed among at least a couple of Sox players.
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Old 08-29-2019, 06:46 AM
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What's the story behind #79 for Abreu?
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Old 08-29-2019, 08:10 AM
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What's the story behind #79 for Abreu?
Obviously a tribute to former Bear Dick Evey.

I seem to recall that Jose's mother told him to choose a unique number that he could make his own. Something like that.
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Old 08-29-2019, 09:08 AM
WhiteSox5187 WhiteSox5187 is offline
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Quote:
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Obviously a tribute to former Bear Dick Evey.

I seem to recall that Jose's mother told him to choose a unique number that he could make his own. Something like that.
Yea I think it was something like that, his mother encouraged him to choose a high number to remind him how far he's come.
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Old 08-29-2019, 02:13 PM
Wsoxmike59 Wsoxmike59 is offline
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I remember Rick Reichardt wore #48 which was an unusual number for an OF back in ‘71-‘72 and then someone told me that it was his number in Football at the University of Wisconsin and that he was a great two sport athlete in both High School and College.
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Old 08-29-2019, 04:26 PM
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Reichardt, in the majors, only wore 48 with the White Sox and in his last game with the Royals. He wore 12 with the Royals after the White Sox released him in 1973 but wore 48 for his last major league game in 1974. The bidding for Reichardt coming out of Wisconsin went high enough that it led to baseball instituting an amateur draft, according to what I read at the time, but despite his promise as a big power hitter, he only once hit more than 20 homers in a major league season. I don't know if Reichardt grabbed the lowest number he could when he went to the Royals or if there was a coach wearing 48 when he got there.

The attitude toward numbers began to change with integration. In 1947, Jackie Robinson was issued 42. His had the highest number on the team (until a fringe September addition). The analogies between uniform numbers and respect or "place" should be obvious. He sort of turned the meaning of the number around by not demanding a lower number when he was given more respect. The respect he gained for black players is even reflected in Ernie Banks being assigned 14 by the Cubs and Minnie Minoso getting 6 from the Indians and 9 with the White Sox.

While it wasn't about race, other players a few years later took large numbers out of pride. In 1971, Terry Forster, age 19, was assigned 51, reflecting his long odds of making the team. He made the team and didn't ask for the lower number for opening day because the 51 showed where he had been in March. Similarly Jim Geddes kept 55 a year later, but more famously, Rich Gossage made 54 a number that would reach the Hall of Fame.
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Old 08-29-2019, 07:25 PM
TommyJohn TommyJohn is online now
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With Gossage and Forster, I believe they were issued those numbers in spring training, when they were among the many hopefuls trying to make the team. When they did, they didn’t want to change them, either out of superstition or to remind them of how far they had come.
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Old 08-29-2019, 09:38 PM
HomeFish HomeFish is offline
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Anthony Rendon on the Nationals wears #6 because he was picked #6 in the draft. He does so to motivate himself, not to celebrate: he believes he should have been picked higher than that.
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