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  #31  
Old 08-31-2019, 07:49 PM
blandman blandman is offline
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Originally Posted by Grzegorz View Post
Public interest? That's your argument for releasing the details about a person death? Maybe the public should pick up a book (preferably not of the comic variety).

Fentanyl is a serious public health crisis, both because of abuse and because of it's accidental and non-accidental inclusion in other things. I know people who have died from fentanyl without ever knowing they were taking fentanyl. In this particular case, there may be blame for Skaggs' passing that wouldn't necessarily mean homicide.

Without getting too political...if you have netflix, there's an episode of Patriot Act that goes in depth into the public health issue fentanyl poses. It's worth a watch if you're interested.
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  #32  
Old 08-31-2019, 07:56 PM
TDog TDog is offline
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Originally Posted by Grzegorz View Post
Public interest? That's your argument for releasing the details about a person death? Maybe the public should pick up a book (preferably not of the comic variety).

How are details about the death of a 27-year-old major league baseball player traveling with his team not in the public interest? I'm currently reading an unillustrated history of the reign England's Henry VII and seriously don't understand your point.
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  #33  
Old 09-01-2019, 02:41 PM
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DumpJerry DumpJerry is offline
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I'm with Chez on this, however the lawsuit will shine the light on the information that was released.

It amazes me how those of us who are not pro athletes have HIPAA rights but pro athletes seem to not have any. Do the CBAs for pro sports contain some sort of HIPAA waiver for medical conditions that effect the player's ability to be active?
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  #34  
Old 09-01-2019, 03:59 PM
blandman blandman is offline
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Originally Posted by DumpJerry View Post
I'm with Chez on this, however the lawsuit will shine the light on the information that was released.

It amazes me how those of us who are not pro athletes have HIPAA rights but pro athletes seem to not have any. Do the CBAs for pro sports contain some sort of HIPAA waiver for medical conditions that effect the player's ability to be active?
HIPAA doesn't apply to this. HIPAA does protect his records for 50 years but only for hospital staff. Hospitals are obligated to disclose information to authorities, and criminal investigators are not subject to HIPAA.
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  #35  
Old 09-01-2019, 04:12 PM
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Originally Posted by DumpJerry View Post
I'm with Chez on this, however the lawsuit will shine the light on the information that was released.

It amazes me how those of us who are not pro athletes have HIPAA rights but pro athletes seem to not have any. Do the CBAs for pro sports contain some sort of HIPAA waiver for medical conditions that effect the player's ability to be active?
This isn't about HPPA rights. An autopsy performed as part of a criminal investigation is not covered under HPPA.

There is a de facto waiving of HPPA rights by professional athletes in that their health information after surgery or even simple trips to the disabled list are reported by team to the public. As it is, many fans here complain about the lack of detail on that account. When a player is suspended for violating the league's drug policies, information detailing the violation is released.

When a person from out of town is found dead in a hotel room triggering a police (if not criminal) investigation, the toxicology report and the autopsy are not covered by HPPA. That is true for a drifter, an executive on a business trip or a professional baseball player traveling with his team. Whether the media cares about the death depends on whether the public cared about the death or whether there is something revealed that should make them care (it urns out he had a contagious disease, for example). There is no question that people cared about the death of Tyler Skaggs. It even led to the postponement of a major league baseball game.

No one can question the public interest of Skaggs' death. Had Skaggs died of natural causes or a disease, had there been no drugs in his system, the manner of death would have been released without specifics. Likely, the team would have had to deal with further questions because the public interest was there, if only to say that he died of natural causes with nothing further our of respect to the family.

That wasn't what happened.

As it turns out, the investigation raises some serious question about illegal drug use that could involve people working for the team. From there the questions branch out into potential different directions.

This has nothing to do with HPPA rights. It amazes me that people don't see that.
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  #36  
Old 09-01-2019, 06:05 PM
SBSoxFan SBSoxFan is offline
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Originally Posted by voodoochile View Post
I agree and certainly it's a cautionary tale if nothing else. Even the youngest, brightest stars/athletes are not immune to addiction. It's a warning for every young player who thinks because they are fast tracking it to the pros to still be careful about the way they live their lives. This also is relevant for a discussion of the opioid addition crisis which can strike anyone anywhere regardless of their societal status.
Yes - In 2017, 70,000 deaths were related to opioid overdoes.

Source - L. Graig, I. Olchefske, and J. Alper, Eds., Pain Management for People with Serious Illness in the Context of the Opioid Use Disorder Epidemic. Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press, 2019.
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  #37  
Old 09-01-2019, 10:51 PM
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Originally Posted by blandman View Post
HIPAA doesn't apply to this. HIPAA does protect his records for 50 years but only for hospital staff. Hospitals are obligated to disclose information to authorities, and criminal investigators are not subject to HIPAA.
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Originally Posted by TDog View Post
This isn't about HPPA rights. An autopsy performed as part of a criminal investigation is not covered under HPPA.

There is a de facto waiving of HPPA rights by professional athletes in that their health information after surgery or even simple trips to the disabled list are reported by team to the public. As it is, many fans here complain about the lack of detail on that account. When a player is suspended for violating the league's drug policies, information detailing the violation is released.

When a person from out of town is found dead in a hotel room triggering a police (if not criminal) investigation, the toxicology report and the autopsy are not covered by HPPA. That is true for a drifter, an executive on a business trip or a professional baseball player traveling with his team. Whether the media cares about the death depends on whether the public cared about the death or whether there is something revealed that should make them care (it urns out he had a contagious disease, for example). There is no question that people cared about the death of Tyler Skaggs. It even led to the postponement of a major league baseball game.

No one can question the public interest of Skaggs' death. Had Skaggs died of natural causes or a disease, had there been no drugs in his system, the manner of death would have been released without specifics. Likely, the team would have had to deal with further questions because the public interest was there, if only to say that he died of natural causes with nothing further our of respect to the family.

That wasn't what happened.

As it turns out, the investigation raises some serious question about illegal drug use that could involve people working for the team. From there the questions branch out into potential different directions.

This has nothing to do with HPPA rights. It amazes me that people don't see that.
I am intimately familiar with who has HIPAA obligations. My HIPAA comments were about how player injuries are handled generally, not the Skaggs situation.
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  #38  
Old 09-02-2019, 02:09 PM
Jollyroger2 Jollyroger2 is offline
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Originally Posted by TDog View Post
This isn't about HPPA rights. An autopsy performed as part of a criminal investigation is not covered under HPPA.

There is a de facto waiving of HPPA rights by professional athletes in that their health information after surgery or even simple trips to the disabled list are reported by team to the public. As it is, many fans here complain about the lack of detail on that account. When a player is suspended for violating the league's drug policies, information detailing the violation is released.

When a person from out of town is found dead in a hotel room triggering a police (if not criminal) investigation, the toxicology report and the autopsy are not covered by HPPA. That is true for a drifter, an executive on a business trip or a professional baseball player traveling with his team. Whether the media cares about the death depends on whether the public cared about the death or whether there is something revealed that should make them care (it urns out he had a contagious disease, for example). There is no question that people cared about the death of Tyler Skaggs. It even led to the postponement of a major league baseball game.

No one can question the public interest of Skaggs' death. Had Skaggs died of natural causes or a disease, had there been no drugs in his system, the manner of death would have been released without specifics. Likely, the team would have had to deal with further questions because the public interest was there, if only to say that he died of natural causes with nothing further our of respect to the family.

That wasn't what happened.

As it turns out, the investigation raises some serious question about illegal drug use that could involve people working for the team. From there the questions branch out into potential different directions.

This has nothing to do with HPPA rights. It amazes me that people don't see that.
The bolded is a key point. Also further is how overly aggressive the team and family were to squelch any rumors coming out of Texas that there might have been drugs or criminal activity involved. You'd think they'd have cooled that a bit, with no doubt someone in the organization knowing the truth.

Even trying to keep the autopsy report from being released until October, after the playoffs and well into football season when it would be secondary news. Everything about this smelled like it was drugs or self-inflicted.

Now the Angels have a PR nightmare to handle in addition to the ongoing investigation that may involve others.
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  #39  
Old 10-13-2019, 01:32 PM
HomeFish HomeFish is offline
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https://deadline.com/2019/10/los-ang...am-1202759028/

an Angels executive was dealing opioids to Skaggs
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  #40  
Old 10-13-2019, 03:14 PM
blandman blandman is offline
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https://deadline.com/2019/10/los-ang...am-1202759028/

an Angels executive was dealing opioids to Skaggs

Holy crap.
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  #41  
Old 10-14-2019, 09:22 AM
WhiteSox5187 WhiteSox5187 is offline
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Holy crap.
This is going to be very ugly and sad.
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  #42  
Old 10-14-2019, 11:32 AM
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DumpJerry DumpJerry is offline
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How many other teams have a "Walter White" working for them?
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  #43  
Old 10-14-2019, 12:36 PM
TDog TDog is offline
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Originally Posted by DumpJerry View Post
How many other teams have a "Walter White" working for them?

Maybe that will be the next big revelation. In the 1980s, I worked with a Pirates fan, hardcore urban-born-in-a-taxi-cab Pennsylvanian. I heard him complaining about all the stuff that was coming out about the cocaine culture on the team. Even the Pittsburgh Parrot was dealing. Use of opioids raises different questions involving treatment of pain that could be job related, not unlike the questions asked about how much management knew, should have known and/or refused to know about performance-enhancing drugs.

Beyond all the tributes to the former teammate and opponent, it was good that journalists didn't blow off investigating the sudden, mysterious death of a young professional athlete out of respect to his family.
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  #44  
Old 10-14-2019, 06:14 PM
Jollyroger2 Jollyroger2 is offline
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This is going to be very ugly and sad.
Yep there were so many rumblings of this down here in Texas when it happened, and any slight mention or rumor was immediately snuffed by the team and family. Add to it how haughty they all got that anyone was questioning this, and how they attacked accusers, etc. and this looks awful for the Angels.
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  #45  
Old Yesterday, 02:43 AM
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thomas35forever thomas35forever is offline
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Originally Posted by Jollyroger2 View Post
Yep there were so many rumblings of this down here in Texas when it happened, and any slight mention or rumor was immediately snuffed by the team and family. Add to it how haughty they all got that anyone was questioning this, and how they attacked accusers, etc. and this looks awful for the Angels.
Yep. They could have one hell of a wrongful death suit on their hands. The Skaggs family would be crazy not to pursue it. And it would be in the Angels' best interest if they cleaned house of anyone who might be involved. Take no chances. Get rid of anyone with potential to be shady. What a mess this is going to be.
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